Volume 5, Issue 2

Volume 5, Issue 2

Volume 5, Issue 2 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available! Read here!

Staying Strong: Enhancing Israel’s Essential Strategic Options

Staying Strong: Enhancing Israel’s Essential Strategic Options

By Louis René Beres* In early 2014, Washington and Moscow competed openly for influence in Egypt: Putin even promised expansive arms packages to now-President Sisi. With this in mind, Sisi is apt to play the U.S. and Russia off against each other, a cold war strategy that has implications for Israel’s security doctrine, including perhaps its nuclear doctrine.(1) Israel operates […]

Photo courtesy of Piero Quarantapiero Quaranta/AFP/Getty Images

Ukraine’s Crisis: Implications for the Law of Armed Conflict

Emory Law Professor Laurie R. Blank argues that the conflict in Ukraine demonstrates the importance of sustaining the strict separation between the law of armed conflict (LOAC) and the jus ad bellum, a low threshold for recognition of international armed conflict, and the principle of distinction in today’s conflicts.

Hostage-Takers and Fleeing Felons: Questioning Two Analogies to the “Imminent Threat” of Terrorist Attack from Abroad

Hostage-Takers and Fleeing Felons: Questioning Two Analogies to the “Imminent Threat” of Terrorist Attack from Abroad

Amien Kacou, attorney at GPI Law PLLC, argues that analogies from the use of lethal force against hostage-takers or fleeing felons to justify targeted killings of suspected al Qaeda terrorists are misguided. Image courtesy of Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY 2.5.

Crimean Diplomacy

Crimean Diplomacy

Katherine Earle of AEI discusses the recent Crimean referendum to join Russia and the associated security implications. Image courtesy of Getty Images.

Monthly National Security Forum: February 2014

Monthly National Security Forum: February 2014

The Harvard National Security Journal is launching a new initiative. Each month, panelists will comment on a question posed by the NSJ staff. This month’s topic: metadata. Image courtesy of NASA.

Features

on May 29, 2014 at 9:43 am

Ukraine’s Crisis Part 3: The Principle of Distinction and LOAC’s Key Goals

By Laurie R. Blank* This is the final article in a three-part series on the Ukrainian crisis’s implications and lessons for the international law of armed conflict. You can read Part 1 and Part 2 here.  Recent events in eastern Ukraine highlight the challenges of identifying the groups involved. Pro-Russian separatists, militants, pro-Ukrainian “street fighters”, nationalists, terrorists — many terms have been used […]

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on May 25, 2014 at 10:37 am

Ukraine’s Crisis Part 2: LOAC’s Threshold for International Armed Conflict

Series Introduction  Following a new outbreak of violence in eastern Ukraine on Thursday, tensions in Ukraine and between Russia and the United States and NATO countries are high ahead of Ukraine’s presidential elections Sunday. Russian troops remain along Ukraine’s eastern border, notwithstanding Moscow’s promise of withdrawal. In this murky situation, however, it is crucial to rely on several foundational principles of international […]

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on February 6, 2014 at 5:36 pm

The Current Landscape of Cybersecurity Policy: Legislative Issues in the 113th Congress

Mitchell S. Kominsky, Counsel for the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, discusses the state of cybersecurity legislation and the evolving nature of cyber policy. Image courtesy of Getty Images.

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on February 3, 2014 at 3:07 pm

Shari’a Courts Move to the Battlefield: Jabhat al-Nusra Opens a Legal Front in the Syrian Civil War

Corri Zoli and Emily Schneider untangle the infighting between rival groups in Syria and the calls to use Shari’a to mediate the conflicts on the battlefield. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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on November 18, 2013 at 1:13 pm

The Reverse Draft: Bringing the Military and Society Back Together

Lieutenant Joseph Hatfield discusses the merits of a “reverse draft” in bridging the growing disconnect between civilian society and the military. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia

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on October 24, 2013 at 8:35 pm

Lessons for Israel from Ancient Chinese Military Thought: Facing Iranian Nuclearization with Sun-Tzu

Professor Louis René Beres brings to bear two classical traditions to apply them to Israeli strategic planning. In this article, he takes a fresh look at Sun-Tzu’s The Art of War and weaves in Greek dialectical reasoning. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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on September 8, 2013 at 1:24 pm

Reforming FISC: Legislative Proposals for Creating a More Balanced FISA Court

Harvard Law Student Menno Goedman discusses critiques of the FISC appointment process in light of the increased public scrutiny of American intelligence operations. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia

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on August 26, 2013 at 4:54 pm

Striking Hezbollah-Bound Weapons in Syria: Israel’s Actions Under International Law

Professor Louis René Beres considers Israeli actions in response to threats emanating from Syria, Lebanon, and Iran in the contexts of weapons transfers, missile attacks, and an increasingly volatile situation in Syria. Map courtesy of Google Maps.

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on August 13, 2013 at 9:37 am

The Future of Drone Warfare

University of Virginia Law Professor Frederick Hitz discusses his theories regarding what he terms the “relentless non-humanity” of drone warfare. Photo courtesy of Getty Images

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on August 7, 2013 at 1:25 pm

Welcome HLS 1Ls!

Dear HLS 1Ls, We at the Harvard National Security Journal (“NSJ”) welcome you to Harvard Law and invite you to get involved in our milestone fifth volume.  At NSJ, you will learn about editing, join an interesting community, and develop your resume.  Right away, you will have the opportunity to take on significant — and substantive — responsibilities. NSJ publishes […]

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