Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Mediterranean Migrant Crisis: Key Considerations for the UN Security Council

The recent tragedies involving migrants in the Mediterranean have stoked urgent calls for UN action.

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia

The Historic Opening to China: What Hath Nixon Wrought?

When President Obama hosts Chinese leader Xi Jinping at the White House this week, he will do so as the eighth US president, starting with Richard Nixon, to engage with China based on a failed strategy. This article revisits a Foreign Affairs article—”Asia After Vietnam”—authored by Richard Nixon in October 1967.

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Cross-eyed: Planning When Host-Nation and Intervener Rule of Law Strategies are Unaligned

By Major Dan Maurer* This essay imagines a fictional future ground conflict pitting the United States and a host country against a non-state militant terrorist organization that has seized territory. This hypothetical scenario imagines a “rule of law” mission in the immediate wake of conventional combat, but suggests that this task will be, ultimately and inevitably, hampered when the intervening […]

Volume 6, Issue 2

Volume 6, Issue 2

Volume 6, Issue 2 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 6 here!

Five Maritime Security Developments That Will Resonate For A Generation

Five Maritime Security Developments That Will Resonate For A Generation

Captain Brian Wilson discusses treaty developments, trends, successes and challenges in maritime security.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.


on November 16, 2015 at 12:18 am

John Bellinger Visits Harvard Law School

In wide-ranging remarks at Harvard Law School on Friday October 16 2015 John Bellinger, now a partner Arnold & Porter LLP, reflected on his 29-year legal career in both the public and the private sectors, discussed international law, and encouraged students to pursue careers in national security.

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on June 2, 2015 at 12:10 am

Core Synergies in Israel’s Strategic Planning: When the Adversarial Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts

To best serve Israel, the country’s strategic studies community should favor more conceptual or “molecular” assessments of expected security perils.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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on April 24, 2015 at 3:36 pm

The Hidden Cost of Drone Combat: Soldiers’ Mental Health

While policymakers may argue that military drone combat presents no risk to American forces, the battle scars for drone operators are more psychological than physical. We should support the mental health of those soldiers we task with operating drones.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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on February 26, 2015 at 4:20 pm

The Lost Dimension: Food Security and the South China Sea Disputes

Food security was a key driver behind the development of the current framework governing the law of the sea. This matters for why–and how–the Chinese are contesting claims in the South China Sea.
Photo courtesy of Reuters.

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on February 24, 2015 at 10:53 am

Drones in the U.S. National Airspace System: A Safety and Security Assessment

3 areas continue to hold our national security at risk and plague drone integration efforts: (1) inadequate safety systems, (2) inadequate statutes, and (3) incomplete threat analyses. The authors discuss each area in detail along with proposed solutions. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia

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on February 24, 2015 at 10:52 am

Expert Interviews for Drones in the U.S. National Airspace System: A Safety and Security Assessment

I. Introduction In 2012, the U.S. Congress passed the FAA Revitalization and Reform Act which among other provisions called for the integration of drones into the U.S. national airspace. While the statutory provision was an attempt to meet the needs of an emerging industry which includes the defense sector, Congress inadvertently failed to examine many of the potential problems relating […]

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on February 17, 2015 at 2:58 pm

Meaningful Transparency: The Missing Numbers the NSA and FISC Should Reveal

Many Americans are skeptical or distrustful of U.S. Government intelligence collection methods. Increasing transparency by presenting additional data in an accessible way could help.

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on January 28, 2015 at 1:05 pm

Problematic Alternatives: MLAT Reform for the Digital Age

Data travels across the globe instantly, but the current system for sharing information across jurisdictions is inadequate. Here’s why we need reform, and what that reform should look like. By Jonah Force Hill.

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on January 15, 2015 at 3:40 pm

Restricted Reporting on California Military Installations: The Unnecessary and Unwise State Law Exception

The military’s restricted reporting policy for sexual assaults–permitting members of the armed services to seek help without initiating a formal investigation–has helped victims and investigators alike. But state law exceptions, like California’s, counteract some of these gains. Here’s why, and how, the exception should be overturned.

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on November 11, 2014 at 2:24 pm

The Best Way to Honor Veterans: Decide Carefully About the Next War

Tony Carr*   As Congress returns for a lame-duck session that promises to be equal parts theatrical and unproductive, President Obama is making a promise of his own: to pursue a new Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) legitimizing action against ISIS. Notwithstanding the division and skepticism of the current political moment, the AUMF represents a critical opportunity […]

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