Image courtesy of Reuters

The Lost Dimension: Food Security and the South China Sea Disputes

Food security was a key driver behind the development of the current framework governing the law of the sea. This matters for why–and how–the Chinese are contesting claims in the South China Sea.
Photo courtesy of Reuters.

Drones in the U.S. National Airspace System: A Safety and Security Assessment

Drones in the U.S. National Airspace System: A Safety and Security Assessment

3 areas continue to hold our national security at risk and plague drone integration efforts: (1) inadequate safety systems, (2) inadequate statutes, and (3) incomplete threat analyses. The authors discuss each area in detail along with proposed solutions. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Meaningful Transparency: The Missing Numbers the NSA and FISC Should Reveal

Many Americans are skeptical or distrustful of U.S. Government intelligence collection methods. Increasing transparency by presenting additional data in an accessible way could help.

Volume 6, Issue 1

Volume 6, Issue 1

Volume 6, Issue 1 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 6 here!

Problematic Alternatives: MLAT Reform for the Digital Age

Problematic Alternatives: MLAT Reform for the Digital Age

Data travels across the globe instantly, but the current system for sharing information across jurisdictions is inadequate. Here’s why we need reform, and what that reform should look like. By Jonah Force Hill.

Photo Credit: AP Images

Restricted Reporting on California Military Installations: The Unnecessary and Unwise State Law Exception

The military’s restricted reporting policy for sexual assaults–permitting members of the armed services to seek help without initiating a formal investigation–has helped victims and investigators alike. But state law exceptions, like California’s, counteract some of these gains. Here’s why, and how, the exception should be overturned.

Features

on February 24, 2015 at 10:52 am

Expert Interviews for Drones in the U.S. National Airspace System: A Safety and Security Assessment

I. Introduction In 2012, the U.S. Congress passed the FAA Revitalization and Reform Act which among other provisions called for the integration of drones into the U.S. national airspace. While the statutory provision was an attempt to meet the needs of an emerging industry which includes the defense sector, Congress inadvertently failed to examine many of the potential problems relating […]

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on November 11, 2014 at 2:24 pm

The Best Way to Honor Veterans: Decide Carefully About the Next War

Tony Carr*   As Congress returns for a lame-duck session that promises to be equal parts theatrical and unproductive, President Obama is making a promise of his own: to pursue a new Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) legitimizing action against ISIS. Notwithstanding the division and skepticism of the current political moment, the AUMF represents a critical opportunity […]

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on October 19, 2014 at 7:26 pm

The Case for Export Control Reform, and What it Means for America

By Brandt Pasco* A signature national security priority of President Barack Obama’s Administration, and an area that has generated rare broad-based bipartisan support, is export control reform.  At the request of Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, in August 2009 President Obama directed the National Security Council and National Economic Council to jointly review the overall export control system.[1]  Now five […]

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on September 29, 2014 at 9:01 pm

Protecting Whistleblowers and Secrets in the Intelligence Community

Daniel D’Isidoro* Introduction Members of the intelligence community receive different whistleblower protections than most federal employees, in large part due to the classified nature of their work. Though recent reforms have sought to shore up whistleblower protections, regulatory gaps remain. The following piece explores some of those gaps through examples, and suggests reforms to address them. Needed reforms include providing […]

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on June 13, 2014 at 8:18 am

Staying Strong: Enhancing Israel’s Essential Strategic Options

By Louis René Beres* In early 2014, Washington and Moscow competed openly for influence in Egypt: Putin even promised expansive arms packages to now-President Sisi. With this in mind, Sisi is apt to play the U.S. and Russia off against each other, a cold war strategy that has implications for Israel’s security doctrine, including perhaps its nuclear doctrine.(1) Israel operates […]

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on May 29, 2014 at 9:43 am

Ukraine’s Crisis Part 3: The Principle of Distinction and LOAC’s Key Goals

By Laurie R. Blank* This is the final article in a three-part series on the Ukrainian crisis’s implications and lessons for the international law of armed conflict. You can read Part 1 and Part 2 here.  Recent events in eastern Ukraine highlight the challenges of identifying the groups involved. Pro-Russian separatists, militants, pro-Ukrainian “street fighters”, nationalists, terrorists — many terms have been used […]

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on May 25, 2014 at 10:37 am

Ukraine’s Crisis Part 2: LOAC’s Threshold for International Armed Conflict

Series Introduction  Following a new outbreak of violence in eastern Ukraine on Thursday, tensions in Ukraine and between Russia and the United States and NATO countries are high ahead of Ukraine’s presidential elections Sunday. Russian troops remain along Ukraine’s eastern border, notwithstanding Moscow’s promise of withdrawal. In this murky situation, however, it is crucial to rely on several foundational principles of international […]

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on May 24, 2014 at 8:29 am

Ukraine’s Crisis: Implications for the Law of Armed Conflict

Emory Law Professor Laurie R. Blank argues that the conflict in Ukraine demonstrates the importance of sustaining the strict separation between the law of armed conflict (LOAC) and the jus ad bellum, a low threshold for recognition of international armed conflict, and the principle of distinction in today’s conflicts.

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on March 31, 2014 at 10:36 pm

Hostage-Takers and Fleeing Felons: Questioning Two Analogies to the “Imminent Threat” of Terrorist Attack from Abroad

Amien Kacou, attorney at GPI Law PLLC, argues that analogies from the use of lethal force against hostage-takers or fleeing felons to justify targeted killings of suspected al Qaeda terrorists are misguided. Image courtesy of Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY 2.5.

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on March 18, 2014 at 11:03 am

Crimean Diplomacy

Katherine Earle of AEI discusses the recent Crimean referendum to join Russia and the associated security implications. Image courtesy of Getty Images.

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