Features

on November 9, 2009 at 5:13 pm

New Thriller Highlights Public Health & National Security Connection

By Mat Trachok, HLS 2012 NSJ Staff Writer According to surgeon and best-selling author Robin Cook, the world is at risk from an imminent, serious pandemic.  Cook has written a new medical thriller entitled Plague, which he hopes will raise consciousness about this potential threat.  In his recent article “Plague: A New Thriller of the Coming Pandemic,” Cook explains the […]

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on November 9, 2009 at 12:02 pm

NSJ Analysis: Fort Hood Shooting Ripe for Controversy

By NSJ Staff Writer The November 8th shootings at Ft. Hood are less than a week old, and yet investigators and pundits are already interpreting what they see to be their deep-seated meaning.  Officially, after two days of investigation, the FBI and the Army Criminal Investigation Command have come to the tentative conclusion that the attacks were not part of […]

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on November 6, 2009 at 2:53 pm

Canadian Court Orders Release of Accused Terrorist Sympathizer

By Jonathan Abrams, HLS 2012 NSJ Staff Writer On October 14th, a Canadian Federal Court judge dismissed the Canadian government’s case against a Montreal resident arrested under a controversial deportation program. In 2003, Adil Charkaoui was arrested under a security certificate–an administrative tool by which the Canadian government can detain non-citizens without charge and without showing them or their lawyers […]

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on November 6, 2009 at 2:53 pm

NSJ Analysis: Italian Court Issues Extraordinary Rendition Convictions

By NSJ Staff Writer On November 4th, an Italian court convicted in absentia 23 Americans–twenty-two purported CIA agents and one Air Force Officer–for their role in the kidnapping and rendition of Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr, better known as Abu Omar.  Twenty-two Americans were given sentences of five years in prison, and the former CIA Milan station chief, Robert Seldon Lady, […]

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on November 6, 2009 at 2:53 pm

Ninth Circuit Rules Unconstitutional Use of Material Witness Statute to Detain Terrorist Suspects

By Jonathan Abrams, HLS 2012 NSJ Staff Writer On September 4th, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit handed down an important ruling on preventive detention, holding that the federal government’s use of the material witness statute, 18 U.S.C. § 3144, to detain suspected terrorists is unconstitutional. The case, al-Kidd v. Ashcroft, 580 F.3d 949 (9th Cir. […]

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on November 5, 2009 at 10:35 am

NSJ Analysis: Connecting the Rule of Law with Afghanistan’s Security Strategy

By NSJ Staff Writer On October 11, 2009, The New York Times reported that, “Afghanistan’s judiciary is so weak that Afghans increasingly turn to a shadow Taliban court system,” especially in rural areas where people lack access to the judicial process.  As the Obama Administration continues to review its Afghanistan strategy to determine whether or not to increase U.S. troop […]

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on November 2, 2009 at 9:24 am

HLS Hosted Panel of Cybersecurity Experts Discuss Cyberterrorist Threat

By Mat Trachok, HLS 2012 NSJ Staff Writer What exactly is the nature of the cyberterrorist threat?  How realistic is the prospect of nation-to-nation cyberwarfare?  How should the government respond to and protect against such threats?  What role should the law play in fighting cyberterrorism?  On Wednesday, October 28th, the Harvard Law School National Security & Law Association and the […]

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on October 25, 2009 at 1:07 pm

Harvard Kennedy School Panel Discusses Bridging the Gap Between Human Rights and National Security

By Peter Dickos, HLS 2012 NSJ Staff Writer The interests of national security and human rights often seem in opposition to each other.  If that is the rule, then it is one that Sarah Sewall, former Director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, breaks every day.  Sewall, also a former […]

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on October 25, 2009 at 12:38 pm

UK High Court Orders Disclosure of Torture Allegation Materials

By Mary Ostberg, HLS 2012 NSJ Staff Writer On Friday, October 16, 2009, the United Kingdom’s High Court ruled that seven paragraphs of UK-U.S. exchanges detailing the alleged torture of Binyam Mohamed should be disclosed.  In reversing its 2008 ruling, the High Court called the public interest in disclosing the paragraphs “overwhelming.” Mr. Mohamed, a British resident who was born […]

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on October 21, 2009 at 7:31 am

Administration Softens Sudan Policy; Maintains Support for ICC Prosecution

By Brian Itami, HLS 2012 NSJ Staff Writer The Obama Administration’s Sudan policy, unveiled on Monday, October 19, 2009, maintains support for the prosecution of President Omar al-Bashir in the International Criminal Court (ICC) despite seeking greater engagement with the Sudanese government. The three major policy objectives include bringing about an end to the “conflict, gross human rights abuses, and […]

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