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on April 24, 2017 at 2:46 pm

The Aviation Insider Threat: An Assessment of Vulnerabilities and Countermeasures

Threats against aviation change constantly; countermeasures developed to combat emergent threats will become obsolete as new threats appear. Therefore, it is imperative for security practitioners to stay ahead of their enemies by identifying potential threats. This Article discusses ways in which current procedures fall short and should be reassessed.

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on July 15, 2016 at 11:09 pm

Partially Unwinding Sanctions: The Problematic Construct of Sanctions Relief in the JCPOA

By Sahand Moarefy By partially unwinding the sanctions regime against Iran, the United States has sought to achieve two goals: provide Iran some meaningful level of economic relief such that it carries through with its commitment to scale back its nuclear program, while preserving the U.S.’s architecture of sanctions that target Iran for non-nuclear reasons. Barring any additional actions by […]

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on March 22, 2016 at 8:54 pm

Religious Freedom as a National Security Imperative: A New Paradigm

This Article proffers a hitherto understated mechanism for the establishment, maintenance and cogent analysis of national security: the establishment and maintenance of religious pluralism. To date, official positions and scholarship sparingly comment on this assertion. To address these gaps and to offer a fresh perspective on this subject, this Article undertakes a legal analysis to buttress the notion that U.S. national security interests can be best served by working towards the establishment of religious pluralism around the globe. Due to its strategic relevance for U.S. national security, the case of Pakistan – and the constitutional and legal apparatus that undergirds its view of religious minorities – serves as a blueprint for understanding this new national security paradigm (“NNSP”).
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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on March 22, 2016 at 8:28 pm

U.S. v. Al Bahlul: Where It’s Been and Where It’s Going

On November 13, 2001 then-President George W. Bush issued a military order that would forever be remembered. His military order “called for the [S]ecretary of [D]efense to detain non-citizens accused of international terrorism.” Specially, the order applied to members of al Qaeda, and “all those who have engaged in, aided, or conspired to commit international terrorist acts against the United States or its citizens.” The Secretary of Defense “[was] charged with establishing military tribunals (also called military commissions) to conduct trials of non-citizens accused of terrorism either in the United States or in other parts of the world.” Then-President Bush’s military order created the United States (U.S.) Military Commissions that have been the center of continued national and international criticism.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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on September 16, 2015 at 4:34 pm

Cross-eyed: Planning When Host-Nation and Intervener Rule of Law Strategies are Unaligned

By Major Dan Maurer* This essay imagines a fictional future ground conflict pitting the United States and a host country against a non-state militant terrorist organization that has seized territory. This hypothetical scenario imagines a “rule of law” mission in the immediate wake of conventional combat, but suggests that this task will be, ultimately and inevitably, hampered when the intervening […]

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on March 11, 2015 at 8:06 am

Five Maritime Security Developments That Will Resonate For A Generation

Captain Brian Wilson discusses treaty developments, trends, successes and challenges in maritime security.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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on February 26, 2015 at 4:20 pm

The Lost Dimension: Food Security and the South China Sea Disputes

Food security was a key driver behind the development of the current framework governing the law of the sea. This matters for why–and how–the Chinese are contesting claims in the South China Sea.
Photo courtesy of Reuters.

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on January 28, 2015 at 1:05 pm

Problematic Alternatives: MLAT Reform for the Digital Age

Data travels across the globe instantly, but the current system for sharing information across jurisdictions is inadequate. Here’s why we need reform, and what that reform should look like. By Jonah Force Hill.

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on January 15, 2015 at 3:40 pm

Restricted Reporting on California Military Installations: The Unnecessary and Unwise State Law Exception

The military’s restricted reporting policy for sexual assaults–permitting members of the armed services to seek help without initiating a formal investigation–has helped victims and investigators alike. But state law exceptions, like California’s, counteract some of these gains. Here’s why, and how, the exception should be overturned.

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on September 29, 2014 at 9:01 pm

Protecting Whistleblowers and Secrets in the Intelligence Community

Daniel D’Isidoro* Introduction Members of the intelligence community receive different whistleblower protections than most federal employees, in large part due to the classified nature of their work. Though recent reforms have sought to shore up whistleblower protections, regulatory gaps remain. The following piece explores some of those gaps through examples, and suggests reforms to address them. Needed reforms include providing […]

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