frontpage

on June 13, 2018 at 10:30 am

Overseeing or Interfering? A Functional Alternative to Congressional Oversight in Intelligence and Operations

by Major Sean B. Zehtab—How should we design oversight of cyber-operations and intelligence gathering as such operations will increasingly take place at the tactical level? Major Sean B. Zehtab of the U.S. Army argues that we should look to the Command Operations Review Board of the U.S. Special Operations Command for guidance.

Read more ›
on May 18, 2018 at 11:43 am

Water Scarcity: The Most Understated Global Security Risk

By Major David J. Stuckenberg and Dr. Anthony L. Contento — This Article examines the global state of freshwater scarcity and the often-neglected linkages of water scarcity to economic, social, political, legal, and security consequences arising from disruptions, failures, or attacks on water access and distribution systems. Poorly understood links between access to adequate water and national stability pose severe global security risks.

Read more ›
on January 11, 2018 at 11:42 am

The Ebola Fighters: Uncharted Territory, or a Repeat of Past Shortcomings?

By Maj. Richard Hossfeld; Brooke Hossfeld; Maj. David Dixon — Instead of waiting passively for effective WHO reform, the United States Government—which currently provides more funding to the WHO than any other member—should act as the authority to influence disease response coordination and declare epidemic and/or pandemic outbreak on behalf of the world.

Read more ›
on January 8, 2018 at 10:57 am

Drones as Crime-Fighting Tools in 2020: Legal and Normative Considerations

It’s 2020 and Boston has become a haven for homicide. Believing that an uptick in drug trafficking is responsible for the uptick in homicides—and left behind by its inability to break into the traffickers’ encrypted devices and communications—the Boston Police Department has a potential solution to its unsolved homicide problem: drones.

Read more ›
on November 7, 2017 at 9:02 am

Aloke Chakravarty at Harvard Law School

On November 2, 2017, Assistant U.S. Attorney Aloke Chakravarty visited Harvard Law School to reflect on his experience as he comes to the end of his service in the Department of Justice (“DOJ”). He also discussed how the field of national security prosecution has evolved since the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Read more ›
on September 14, 2017 at 12:50 pm

India’s Distressed Justice Sector: A Matter of U.S. National Security Concern

By Dan E. Stigall — This Article highlights the degree to which institutional frailty in the Indian justice sector poses a national security risk to the United States, and illuminates policy choices that can serve to mitigate this potential threat to U.S. persons and national interests. In particular, this Article demonstrates that a revitalized Indian justice sector would help create a bulwark against regional instability and the pernicious threat posed by global jihadist groups currently seeking a foothold in South Asia.

Read more ›
on April 24, 2017 at 2:46 pm

The Aviation Insider Threat: An Assessment of Vulnerabilities and Countermeasures

Threats against aviation change constantly; countermeasures developed to combat emergent threats will become obsolete as new threats appear. Therefore, it is imperative for security practitioners to stay ahead of their enemies by identifying potential threats. This Article discusses ways in which current procedures fall short and should be reassessed.

Read more ›
on July 15, 2016 at 11:09 pm

Partially Unwinding Sanctions: The Problematic Construct of Sanctions Relief in the JCPOA

By Sahand Moarefy By partially unwinding the sanctions regime against Iran, the United States has sought to achieve two goals: provide Iran some meaningful level of economic relief such that it carries through with its commitment to scale back its nuclear program, while preserving the U.S.’s architecture of sanctions that target Iran for non-nuclear reasons. Barring any additional actions by […]

Read more ›
on March 22, 2016 at 8:54 pm

Religious Freedom as a National Security Imperative: A New Paradigm

This Article proffers a hitherto understated mechanism for the establishment, maintenance and cogent analysis of national security: the establishment and maintenance of religious pluralism. To date, official positions and scholarship sparingly comment on this assertion. To address these gaps and to offer a fresh perspective on this subject, this Article undertakes a legal analysis to buttress the notion that U.S. national security interests can be best served by working towards the establishment of religious pluralism around the globe. Due to its strategic relevance for U.S. national security, the case of Pakistan – and the constitutional and legal apparatus that undergirds its view of religious minorities – serves as a blueprint for understanding this new national security paradigm (“NNSP”).
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Read more ›
on March 22, 2016 at 8:28 pm

U.S. v. Al Bahlul: Where It’s Been and Where It’s Going

On November 13, 2001 then-President George W. Bush issued a military order that would forever be remembered. His military order “called for the [S]ecretary of [D]efense to detain non-citizens accused of international terrorism.” Specially, the order applied to members of al Qaeda, and “all those who have engaged in, aided, or conspired to commit international terrorist acts against the United States or its citizens.” The Secretary of Defense “[was] charged with establishing military tribunals (also called military commissions) to conduct trials of non-citizens accused of terrorism either in the United States or in other parts of the world.” Then-President Bush’s military order created the United States (U.S.) Military Commissions that have been the center of continued national and international criticism.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Read more ›