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on November 7, 2017 at 9:02 am

Aloke Chakravarty at Harvard Law School

On November 2, 2017, Assistant U.S. Attorney Aloke Chakravarty visited Harvard Law School to reflect on his experience as he comes to the end of his service in the Department of Justice (“DOJ”). He also discussed how the field of national security prosecution has evolved since the September 11 terrorist attacks.

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on September 14, 2017 at 12:50 pm

India’s Distressed Justice Sector: A Matter of U.S. National Security Concern

By Dan E. Stigall — This Article highlights the degree to which institutional frailty in the Indian justice sector poses a national security risk to the United States, and illuminates policy choices that can serve to mitigate this potential threat to U.S. persons and national interests. In particular, this Article demonstrates that a revitalized Indian justice sector would help create a bulwark against regional instability and the pernicious threat posed by global jihadist groups currently seeking a foothold in South Asia.

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on August 8, 2017 at 11:44 am

Lancelot in the Sky: Protecting Wounded Combatants from Incidental Harm

By Major R. Scott Adams. This Article will show that LOAC does not transform combatants into noncombatants under the hors de combat concept. It will then show that current U.S. policy is overly restrictive by erroneously granting noncombatant status to persons hors de combat.

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on April 24, 2017 at 2:46 pm

The Aviation Insider Threat: An Assessment of Vulnerabilities and Countermeasures

Threats against aviation change constantly; countermeasures developed to combat emergent threats will become obsolete as new threats appear. Therefore, it is imperative for security practitioners to stay ahead of their enemies by identifying potential threats. This Article discusses ways in which current procedures fall short and should be reassessed.

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on February 1, 2017 at 3:49 pm

Quis custodiet ipsos custodies?: Who Watches the Watchlisters?

This article summarizes the nature and purpose of the government’s terrorist watchlists, discusses the rules followed by agency screeners, explores the civil liberties implications of watchlisting, and identifies the need for oversight of the process.

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on July 15, 2016 at 11:09 pm

Partially Unwinding Sanctions: The Problematic Construct of Sanctions Relief in the JCPOA

By Sahand Moarefy By partially unwinding the sanctions regime against Iran, the United States has sought to achieve two goals: provide Iran some meaningful level of economic relief such that it carries through with its commitment to scale back its nuclear program, while preserving the U.S.’s architecture of sanctions that target Iran for non-nuclear reasons. Barring any additional actions by […]

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on March 22, 2016 at 8:54 pm

Religious Freedom as a National Security Imperative: A New Paradigm

This Article proffers a hitherto understated mechanism for the establishment, maintenance and cogent analysis of national security: the establishment and maintenance of religious pluralism. To date, official positions and scholarship sparingly comment on this assertion. To address these gaps and to offer a fresh perspective on this subject, this Article undertakes a legal analysis to buttress the notion that U.S. national security interests can be best served by working towards the establishment of religious pluralism around the globe. Due to its strategic relevance for U.S. national security, the case of Pakistan – and the constitutional and legal apparatus that undergirds its view of religious minorities – serves as a blueprint for understanding this new national security paradigm (“NNSP”).
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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on February 1, 2016 at 3:21 pm

Volume 7, Issue 1

Volume 7, Issue 1 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 7 here !

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on September 16, 2015 at 4:34 pm

Cross-eyed: Planning When Host-Nation and Intervener Rule of Law Strategies are Unaligned

By Major Dan Maurer* This essay imagines a fictional future ground conflict pitting the United States and a host country against a non-state militant terrorist organization that has seized territory. This hypothetical scenario imagines a “rule of law” mission in the immediate wake of conventional combat, but suggests that this task will be, ultimately and inevitably, hampered when the intervening […]

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on June 3, 2015 at 10:29 am

Volume 6, Issue 2

Volume 6, Issue 2 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 6 here!

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