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on June 13, 2018 at 10:30 am

Overseeing or Interfering? A Functional Alternative to Congressional Oversight in Intelligence and Operations

by Major Sean B. Zehtab—How should we design oversight of cyber-operations and intelligence gathering as such operations will increasingly take place at the tactical level? Major Sean B. Zehtab of the U.S. Army argues that we should look to the Command Operations Review Board of the U.S. Special Operations Command for guidance.

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on June 10, 2018 at 9:25 am

Volume 9, Issue 2

Volume 9, Issue 2 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available.

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on May 18, 2018 at 11:43 am

Water Scarcity: The Most Understated Global Security Risk

By Major David J. Stuckenberg and Dr. Anthony L. Contento — This Article examines the global state of freshwater scarcity and the often-neglected linkages of water scarcity to economic, social, political, legal, and security consequences arising from disruptions, failures, or attacks on water access and distribution systems. Poorly understood links between access to adequate water and national stability pose severe global security risks.

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on January 29, 2018 at 12:17 pm

Volume 9, Issue 1

Volume 9, Issue 1 of the National Security Journal is now available.

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on January 11, 2018 at 11:42 am

The Ebola Fighters: Uncharted Territory, or a Repeat of Past Shortcomings?

By Maj. Richard Hossfeld; Brooke Hossfeld; Maj. David Dixon — Instead of waiting passively for effective WHO reform, the United States Government—which currently provides more funding to the WHO than any other member—should act as the authority to influence disease response coordination and declare epidemic and/or pandemic outbreak on behalf of the world.

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on November 7, 2017 at 9:02 am

Aloke Chakravarty at Harvard Law School

On November 2, 2017, Assistant U.S. Attorney Aloke Chakravarty visited Harvard Law School to reflect on his experience as he comes to the end of his service in the Department of Justice (“DOJ”). He also discussed how the field of national security prosecution has evolved since the September 11 terrorist attacks.

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on September 14, 2017 at 12:50 pm

India’s Distressed Justice Sector: A Matter of U.S. National Security Concern

By Dan E. Stigall — This Article highlights the degree to which institutional frailty in the Indian justice sector poses a national security risk to the United States, and illuminates policy choices that can serve to mitigate this potential threat to U.S. persons and national interests. In particular, this Article demonstrates that a revitalized Indian justice sector would help create a bulwark against regional instability and the pernicious threat posed by global jihadist groups currently seeking a foothold in South Asia.

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on August 8, 2017 at 11:44 am

Lancelot in the Sky: Protecting Wounded Combatants from Incidental Harm

By Major R. Scott Adams. This Article will show that LOAC does not transform combatants into noncombatants under the hors de combat concept. It will then show that current U.S. policy is overly restrictive by erroneously granting noncombatant status to persons hors de combat.

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on April 24, 2017 at 2:46 pm

The Aviation Insider Threat: An Assessment of Vulnerabilities and Countermeasures

Threats against aviation change constantly; countermeasures developed to combat emergent threats will become obsolete as new threats appear. Therefore, it is imperative for security practitioners to stay ahead of their enemies by identifying potential threats. This Article discusses ways in which current procedures fall short and should be reassessed.

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on February 1, 2017 at 3:49 pm

Quis custodiet ipsos custodies?: Who Watches the Watchlisters?

This article summarizes the nature and purpose of the government’s terrorist watchlists, discusses the rules followed by agency screeners, explores the civil liberties implications of watchlisting, and identifies the need for oversight of the process.

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