Featured

on July 15, 2016 at 11:09 pm

Partially Unwinding Sanctions: The Problematic Construct of Sanctions Relief in the JCPOA

By Sahand Moarefy By partially unwinding the sanctions regime against Iran, the United States has sought to achieve two goals: provide Iran some meaningful level of economic relief such that it carries through with its commitment to scale back its nuclear program, while preserving the U.S.’s architecture of sanctions that target Iran for non-nuclear reasons. Barring any additional actions by […]

Read more ›
on March 22, 2016 at 8:54 pm

Religious Freedom as a National Security Imperative: A New Paradigm

This Article proffers a hitherto understated mechanism for the establishment, maintenance and cogent analysis of national security: the establishment and maintenance of religious pluralism. To date, official positions and scholarship sparingly comment on this assertion. To address these gaps and to offer a fresh perspective on this subject, this Article undertakes a legal analysis to buttress the notion that U.S. national security interests can be best served by working towards the establishment of religious pluralism around the globe. Due to its strategic relevance for U.S. national security, the case of Pakistan – and the constitutional and legal apparatus that undergirds its view of religious minorities – serves as a blueprint for understanding this new national security paradigm (“NNSP”).
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Read more ›
on February 1, 2016 at 3:21 pm

Volume 7, Issue 1

Volume 7, Issue 1 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 7 here !

Read more ›
on September 16, 2015 at 4:34 pm

Cross-eyed: Planning When Host-Nation and Intervener Rule of Law Strategies are Unaligned

By Major Dan Maurer* This essay imagines a fictional future ground conflict pitting the United States and a host country against a non-state militant terrorist organization that has seized territory. This hypothetical scenario imagines a “rule of law” mission in the immediate wake of conventional combat, but suggests that this task will be, ultimately and inevitably, hampered when the intervening […]

Read more ›
on June 3, 2015 at 10:29 am

Volume 6, Issue 2

Volume 6, Issue 2 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 6 here!

Read more ›
on June 2, 2015 at 12:10 am

Core Synergies in Israel’s Strategic Planning: When the Adversarial Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts

To best serve Israel, the country’s strategic studies community should favor more conceptual or “molecular” assessments of expected security perils.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Read more ›
on April 24, 2015 at 3:36 pm

The Hidden Cost of Drone Combat: Soldiers’ Mental Health

While policymakers may argue that military drone combat presents no risk to American forces, the battle scars for drone operators are more psychological than physical. We should support the mental health of those soldiers we task with operating drones.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Read more ›
on March 11, 2015 at 8:06 am

Five Maritime Security Developments That Will Resonate For A Generation

Captain Brian Wilson discusses treaty developments, trends, successes and challenges in maritime security.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Read more ›
on February 26, 2015 at 4:20 pm

The Lost Dimension: Food Security and the South China Sea Disputes

Food security was a key driver behind the development of the current framework governing the law of the sea. This matters for why–and how–the Chinese are contesting claims in the South China Sea.
Photo courtesy of Reuters.

Read more ›
on February 4, 2015 at 11:19 am

Volume 6, Issue 1

Volume 6, Issue 1 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 6 here!

Read more ›