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on June 3, 2015 at 10:29 am

Volume 6, Issue 2

Volume 6, Issue 2 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 6 here!

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on June 2, 2015 at 12:10 am

Core Synergies in Israel’s Strategic Planning: When the Adversarial Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts

To best serve Israel, the country’s strategic studies community should favor more conceptual or “molecular” assessments of expected security perils.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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on April 24, 2015 at 3:36 pm

The Hidden Cost of Drone Combat: Soldiers’ Mental Health

While policymakers may argue that military drone combat presents no risk to American forces, the battle scars for drone operators are more psychological than physical. We should support the mental health of those soldiers we task with operating drones.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

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on March 11, 2015 at 8:06 am

Five Maritime Security Developments That Will Resonate For A Generation

Captain Brian Wilson discusses treaty developments, trends, successes and challenges in maritime security.
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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on February 26, 2015 at 4:20 pm

The Lost Dimension: Food Security and the South China Sea Disputes

Food security was a key driver behind the development of the current framework governing the law of the sea. This matters for why–and how–the Chinese are contesting claims in the South China Sea.
Photo courtesy of Reuters.

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on February 4, 2015 at 11:19 am

Volume 6, Issue 1

Volume 6, Issue 1 of the Harvard National Security Journal is now available. Read Volume 6 here!

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on January 28, 2015 at 1:05 pm

Problematic Alternatives: MLAT Reform for the Digital Age

Data travels across the globe instantly, but the current system for sharing information across jurisdictions is inadequate. Here’s why we need reform, and what that reform should look like. By Jonah Force Hill.

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on January 15, 2015 at 3:40 pm

Restricted Reporting on California Military Installations: The Unnecessary and Unwise State Law Exception

The military’s restricted reporting policy for sexual assaults–permitting members of the armed services to seek help without initiating a formal investigation–has helped victims and investigators alike. But state law exceptions, like California’s, counteract some of these gains. Here’s why, and how, the exception should be overturned.

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on November 11, 2014 at 2:24 pm

The Best Way to Honor Veterans: Decide Carefully About the Next War

Tony Carr*   As Congress returns for a lame-duck session that promises to be equal parts theatrical and unproductive, President Obama is making a promise of his own: to pursue a new Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF) legitimizing action against ISIS. Notwithstanding the division and skepticism of the current political moment, the AUMF represents a critical opportunity […]

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on October 19, 2014 at 7:26 pm

The Case for Export Control Reform, and What it Means for America

By Brandt Pasco* A signature national security priority of President Barack Obama’s Administration, and an area that has generated rare broad-based bipartisan support, is export control reform.  At the request of Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, in August 2009 President Obama directed the National Security Council and National Economic Council to jointly review the overall export control system.[1]  Now five […]

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